Avalanche Lake Trail Glacier National Park ~ a slow hiker's guide™

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Avalanche Lake Trail is one of the busiest trails in Glacier Park   McDonald Lake Trail Map

Avalanche Lake Trail

August 16, 2013

Cover shot of my Wildflower Guide for Glacier National Park. Note: You need to have iBooks app installed on your computer for this link to go to the correct page. (iPad or Mavericks) Your iPad will need iBooks 3 or later, your MAC will need OS X.9 or later and iBooks 1.0 or later.

Available on iBooks wildflower book cover

A slow hiker's guide™ Glacier National Park Wildflowers
If the link doesn't take you to a screen with Get Sample then click on the View in iBooks Button.




During the winter of 2010 / 2011 there was an avalanche/micro burst that knocked down over fifty large trees from Avalanche Creek up to the Avalanche Lake Trail. These downed trees have opened up a new view of the mountains at Logan Pass from the Avalanche Lake Trail. The south western slopes of Mount Canon and Hidden Creek are now visible from Avalanche Lake Trail. The downed trees from the micro burst are about 1 mile from the start of the trail so at this point about one mile remains till Avalanche Lake. Glacier National Park Trail crews have cleared all but one of these trees from the trail. The mud and snow that was everywhere at the start of July 2011 are gone. On the return from Avalanche Lake at the new view spot I watched a grizzly sow and her twin bear cubs on the slopes of Mount Canon. Luckily some other hikers had good binoculars as I did not have my telephoto lens with me. I returned to this site on 7-21-11 with my long lens but no sign of any bears on the trail. Did see a large black bear cross Going To The Sun Road about half way between Apgar and Sprague Creek. The normally wide beach at Avalanche Lake is almost non existent. As you get nearer to the lake the forest undergrowth crowds the trail, having grown two feet a week since my last hike up to Avalanche Lake.

Avalanche Lake Trail is one of the most traveled trails in Glacier National Park. Avalanche Lake Trail is a fairly easy rolling trail through an old growth cedar forest. This is a busy, crowded trail during the height of the summer season. The top photo of Avalanche Lake was taken in mid August of 2006. The black and white photo above was taken in 1901. Water level in 2006 was very low. Trail of the Cedars provides a scenic link to the trailhead for Avalanche Lake Trail. Few hikers realize the amount of maintenance that Glacier National Park Trail crews perform every year to keep these trails open.

The latest image from Google of Avalanche Lake (click the hybrid button) shows the classic turquoise color of glacier fed lakes. Cracker Lake is the only glacier fed lake that I have hiked to that the turquoise color of glacier fed lakes shows at the shoreline of the lake itself. You get a hint of the color looking at the far side of the lake but nothing as powerful as how Grinnell Lake looks from the Grinnell Lake Overlook Trail.

Top photo of Avalanche Lake was taken by me in 2006, bottom photo was taken one hundred and five years earlier by USGS in 1901. Glacier National Park, Montana. Avalanche basin.
Chapman, R.H.

avalanche lake glacier park © Shawn Coggins

Photo of Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park. © Shawn Coggins


avalanche lake 1911

USGS 1901. Glacier National Park, Montana. Avalanche basin. Chapman, R.H.

Photo of Avalanche Lake mid May 2007. © Shawn Coggins The winter of 2006/2007 was a 'light' snow year. Surprisingly, I didn't encounter any other hikers until arriving at Avalanche Lake shore. On the return hike I ran into several bus loads of school kids on a field trip to Glacier National Park. If you're seeking tranquility this is not the trail to hike.


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